Floyd Mayweather earns unanimous decision win over Andre Berto in likely final fight

LAS VEGAS -- Perfection.

If this truly was the final fight of pound-for-pound king Floyd Mayweather's career, as he claims it will be, he will go out having put on another brilliant display, notching another easy win and finishing with a perfect record.

Mayweather did as he pleased in a one-sided rout of Andre Berto to retain the welterweight world title before a crowd of 13,395 on Saturday night at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. In doing so, the 38-year-old matched the hallowed 49-0 mark with which heavyweight legend Rocky Marciano retired.

"My career is over. It's official," said Mayweather, who spent 17 years of his 19-year career as a world champion.

All three judges had it wide for Mayweather: 120-108, 118-110, 117-111. ESPN.com had it a 120-108 shutout.

Asked what matching Marciano's record -- the best in boxing history for a fighter who retired as a champion -- meant to him, Mayweather said, "That means it's part of boxing history. Records are made to be broken. Hopefully, we can find the next Floyd Mayweather who can break the record. Right now, I only want to spend time with my family."

In his follow-up fight to his revenue record-shattering victory against Manny Pacquiao on May 2, Mayweather -- who earned another $32 million Saturday night to add to his wealth -- returned to face Berto, a former two-time welterweight titleholder who entered the bout just 3-3 in his past six fights.

The matchup had been widely panned as a mismatch. Berto, the critics said, had no prayer to win. As it turned out, he was not remotely competitive, as Mayweather was razor-sharp.

"He's a tough competitor, but experience played a major role tonight," Mayweather said.

If Mayweather's retirement holds -- and virtually everybody is a skeptic except for Mayweather and those on his team -- he will have finished his career by facing his 16th consecutive (and 24th overall) current or former world titleholder and by taking part in his 26th world title.

Mayweather, who won world titles in five weight classes from junior lightweight to junior middleweight, completed a six-fight, 30-month contract with Showtime/CBS that he signed in early 2013. It was a deal that earned him more than $400 million, including a record of approximately $250 million for the fight with Pacquiao.

Even though he remains at the top of his game and can still command big bucks, Mayweather insisted this was, as he said in the buildup to the fight, his "last dance."

"You got to know when to hang it up, and it's time for me to hang it up," Mayweather said. "I'm not going to be doing this when I'm 40 years old.